From the IRS: Health Care Law Brings Changes to IRS Tax Forms

Health Care Law Brings Changes to IRS Tax Forms

This year, there are some changes to tax forms related to the Affordable Care Act. Along with a few new lines on existing forms, there will also be two new forms that will need to be included with some tax returns. While most taxpayers will simply need to check a box on their tax return to indicate they had health coverage for all of 2014, there are also new lines on Forms 1040, 1040A, and 1040EZ related to the health care law.

To help navigate these changes, taxpayers and their tax professionals should consider filing their return electronically. Using tax preparation software is the best and simplest way to file a complete and accurate tax return as it guides individuals and tax preparers through the process and does all the math. There are a variety of electronic filing options, including free volunteer assistance, IRS Free File for taxpayers who qualify, commercial software, and professional assistance.

Here is information about the new forms and updates to the existing forms:

Form 8965, Health Coverage Exemptions

Complete this form to report a Marketplace-granted coverage exemption or claim an IRS-granted coverage exemption on the return.
Use the worksheet in the Form 8965 Instructions to calculate the shared responsibility payment.
Form 8962, Premium Tax Credit

Complete this form to reconcile advance payments of the premium tax credit, and to claim this credit on the tax return.
Additionally, if individuals purchased coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace, they should receive Form 1095-A, Health Insurance Marketplace Statement, which will help complete Form 8962.

Form 1040

Line 46: Enter advance payments of the premium tax credit that must be repaid
Line 61: Report health coverage and enter individual shared responsibility payment
Line 69: If eligible, claim net premium tax credit, which is the excess of allowed premium tax credit over advance credit payments
Form 1040A

Line 29: Enter advance payments of the premium tax credit that must be repaid
Line 38: Report health coverage and enter individual shared responsibility payment
Line 45: If eligible, claim net premium tax credit, which is the excess of allowed premium tax credit over advance credit payments
Form 1040EZ

Line 11: Report health coverage and enter individual shared responsibility payment
Form 1040EZ cannot be used to report advance payments or to claim the premium tax credit
For more information about the Affordable Care Act and filing your 2014 income tax return visit IRS.gov/aca.

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From the IRS: New IRS Publication helps you understand the Health Care Law

New IRS Publication helps you understand the Health Care Law

There is a new publication that will help you learn about how the Affordable Care Act affects your taxes. IRS Publication 5187, Health Care Law: What’s New for Individuals and Families is now available on IRS.gov/aca. While the health care law has several parts, this publication breaks down what’s new for the 2014 federal tax return you will be filing in 2015.

This new publication provides important information for taxpayers who:

Had health insurance coverage for the entire year
Did not have health coverage for each month of the year
Purchased health insurance from the Marketplace
Might be eligible for an exemption from the coverage requirement
Had advance payments of the premium tax credit sent to their insurance provider
Is claiming the premium tax credit on their tax return
The publication includes a glossary that will help you understand new terms related to ACA. It also addresses the new lines for reporting ACA information on Forms 1040, 1040-A and 1040-EZ.

Most people have qualifying health coverage, and all they will need to do is simply check a box on their tax return.

You can access Publication 5187 at IRS.gov/aca, along with other important information related to the health care law. You can also find it by typing “p5187” into the search window at the top of any IRS.gov page or “5187” in the Forms and Pubs search window on IRS.gov.

Tablet Safety 101 – Making Your Tablet Safer for Public Use

Tax Tips are not a substitute for legal, accounting, tax, investment or other professional advice. Always consult with your trusted accounting advisor before acting upon any Tax Tip.

Tablet Safety 101 – Making Your Tablet Safer for Public Use

People are relying on tablet devices more and more every day. You use them for work and some for play. Tablets provide users with many of the benefits a laptop delivers, but in a format that’s even easier to take on the go. But, is your information safe when you use your tablet?

As with most things in life, there are things you can do to make your tablet a safer choice to use for business or pleasure while on the go.
•Install anti-virus software for your tablet device. You should only use trusted anti-virus names for this though as some savvy hackers have taken to creating fake anti-virus programs that actually install viruses on your devices.
•Be cautious when installing apps. Apps are notorious for not safeguarding your privacy.
•Enable capabilities to remotely wipe your device if it stolen and notify your provider (if applicable) right away if you have not installed those capabilities.
•Don’t click on advertisements on your tablet. Many ads automatically download viruses onto your device without your notice.
•Lock your screen when you’re not using your device.
•Don’t store log-in data on your tablet device. This makes it too easy for people who “find” your tablet to access your passwords, private, and financial information. The harder you make it for them to do, the less likely it becomes that they’ll go to the effort.
•Backup your data routinely. Some people do this daily. Depending on how often you use your tablet and what kind of data is stored on your tablet, this is a wise move to make.

The Dangers of Public Wi-Fi

Public Wi-Fi connection present very specific dangers to your tablet device. Many hackers disguise themselves as legitimate Wi-Fi connections and hang out in hot spots hoping someone will choose their connection to attempt a logging on. Once you’re connected to their device, bad things can happen. Look for secure Wi-Fi connections and be cautious when using public Wi-Fi.

It’s best to avoid it whenever possible though – especially when using your tablet for business or personal financial matters. Tablet devices are somewhat risky to use – especially for personal and financial information like reviewing tax returns or balancing your checkbook in public. However, the steps above will make your tablet safer for limited use in public.

TAX ADVICE DISCLAIMER: In accordance with IRS Circular 230, any tax advice included in this communication, including attachments, is not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used by you or any other person or entity, for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed under the Internal Revenue Code or applicable state or local tax law provisions, nor may any such advice be used to promote, market or recommend to another party any transaction or matter addressed within this communication. If you would like such advice, please contact us.
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TLC Financial, Inc. (TLC TAX) is a Minneapolis accounting firm that provides a wide variety of accounting, tax and financial management services. Our clients are located in Minneapolis, Saint Paul, Midway, Minnehaha, Como Park, Summit Hill and surrounding communities.

What do I need to know about the Health Care Law for my 2013 Tax Return?

For most people, the Affordable Care Act has no effect on their 2013 federal income tax return. For example, you will not report health care coverage under the individual shared responsibility provision or claim the premium tax credit until you file your 2014 return in 2015.

However, for some people, a few provisions may affect your 2013 tax return, such as increases in the itemized medical deduction threshold, the additional Medicare tax and the net investment income tax.

Here are some additional tips:

Filing Requirement: If you do not have a tax filing requirement, you do not need to file a 2013 federal tax return to establish eligibility or qualify for financial assistance, including advance payments of the premium tax credit to purchase health insurance coverage through a Health Insurance Marketplace. Learn more at HealthCare.gov.

W-2 Reporting of Employer Coverage: The value of health care coverage reported by your employer in box 12 and identified by Code DD on your Form W-2 is not taxable. Learn more.

Information available about other tax provisions in the health care law: More information is available on IRS.gov regarding the following tax provisions: Premium Rebate for Medical Loss Ratio, Health Flexible Spending Arrangements, and Health Saving Accounts.

More Information

Find out more tax-related provisions of the health care law at IRS.gov/aca.

Find out more about the Health Insurance Marketplace at HealthCare.gov.

ACA: Time May be Running Out – March 31 is an Important Deadline

Health Care Law Considerations for 2014

For most people, the Affordable Care Act has no effect on the 2013 income tax return they are filing in 2014. However, some people may need to make important decisions by the March 31, 2014 deadline for open enrollment.

Below are five things about the health care law you may need to consider soon.

• Currently Insured – No Change: If you already insured, you do not need to do anything more than continue your insurance.

• Uninsured – Enroll by March 31: The open enrollment period to purchase health care coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace for 2014 runs through March 31, 2014. When you get health insurance through the marketplace, you may be able to get advance payments of the premium tax credit that will immediately help lower your monthly premium. Learn more at HealthCare.gov.

• Premium Tax Credit To Lower Your Monthly Premium: If you get insurance through the Marketplace, you may be eligible to claim the premium tax credit. You can elect to have advance payments of the tax credit sent directly to your insurer during 2014 so that the monthly premium you pay is lower, or wait to claim the credit when you file your tax return in 2015. If you choose to have advance payments sent to your insurer, you will have to reconcile the payments on your 2014 tax return, which will be filed in 2015. If you’re already receiving advance payments of the credit, you need to do nothing at this time unless you have a change in circumstance like a change in income or family size. Learn More.

• Change in Circumstances: If you’re receiving advance payments of the premium tax credit to help pay for your insurance coverage, you should report life changes, such as income, marital status or family size changes, to the Marketplace. Reporting changes will help to make sure you have the right coverage and are getting the proper amount of advance payments of the premium tax credit.

• Individual Shared Responsibility Payment: Starting January 2014, you and your family have been required to have health care coverage or have an exemption from coverage. Most people already have qualifying health care coverage. These individuals will not need to do anything more than maintain that coverage throughout 2014. If you can afford coverage but decide not to buy it and remain uninsured, you may have to make an individual shared responsibility payment when you file your 2014 tax return in 2015. Learn More.

More Information

Find out more tax-related provisions of the health care law at IRS.gov/aca.

Find out more about the Health Insurance Marketplace at HealthCare.gov.

Deducting Medical and Dental Expenses

If you plan to claim a deduction for your medical expenses, there are some new rules this year that may affect your tax return. Here are eight things you should know about the medical and dental expense deduction:

1. AGI threshold increase. Starting in 2013, the amount of allowable medical expenses you must exceed before you can claim a deduction is 10 percent of your adjusted gross income. The threshold was 7.5 percent of AGI in prior years.

2. Temporary exception for age 65. The AGI threshold is still 7.5 percent of your AGI if you or your spouse is age 65 or older. This exception will apply through Dec. 31, 2016.

3. You must itemize. You can only claim your medical and dental expenses if you itemize deductions on your federal tax return. You can’t claim these expenses if you take the standard deduction.

4. Paid in 2013. You can include only the expenses you paid in 2013. If you paid by check, the day you mailed or delivered the check is usually considered the date of payment.

5. Costs to include. You can include most medical or dental costs that you paid for yourself, your spouse and your dependents. Some exceptions and special rules apply. Any costs reimbursed by insurance or other sources don’t qualify for a deduction.

6. Expenses that qualify. You can include the costs of diagnosing, treating, easing or preventing disease. The cost of insurance premiums that you pay for policies that cover medical care qualifies, as does the cost of some long-term care insurance. The cost of prescription drugs and insulin also qualify. For more examples of costs you can deduct, see IRS Publication 502, Medical and Dental Expenses.

7. Travel costs count. You may be able to claim the cost of travel for medical care. This includes costs such as public transportation, ambulance service, tolls and parking fees. If you use your car, you can deduct either the actual costs or the standard mileage rate for medical travel. The rate is 24 cents per mile for 2013.

8. No double benefit. You can’t claim a tax deduction for medical and dental expenses you paid with funds from your Health Savings Accounts or Flexible Spending Arrangements. Amounts paid with funds from those plans are usually tax-free.

Publication 502 is available on IRS.gov or you can order it by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Additional IRS Resources:

Changes to Itemized Deduction for 2013 Medical Expenses
Questions and Answers: Changes to the Itemized Deduction for 2013 Medical Expenses
Publication 969, Health Savings Accounts and Other Tax-Favored Health Plans

Reduce Your Taxes with Miscellaneous Deductions

If you itemize deductions on your tax return, you may be able to deduct certain miscellaneous expenses. You may benefit from this because a tax deduction normally reduces your federal income tax.

Here are some things you should know about miscellaneous deductions:

Deductions Subject to the Two Percent Limit. You can deduct most miscellaneous expenses only if they exceed two percent of your adjusted gross income. These include expenses such as:

Unreimbursed employee expenses.
Expenses related to searching for a new job in the same profession.
Certain work clothes and uniforms.
Tools needed for your job.
Union dues.
Work-related travel and transportation.

Deductions Not Subject to the Two Percent Limit. Some deductions are not subject to the two percent of AGI limit. Some expenses on this list include:

Certain casualty and theft losses. This deduction applies if you held the damaged or stolen property for investment. Property that you hold for investment may include assets such as stocks, bonds and works of art.
Gambling losses up to the amount of gambling winnings.
Losses from Ponzi-type investment schemes.
Many expenses are not deductible. For example, you can’t deduct personal living or family expenses. Report your miscellaneous deductions on Schedule A, Itemized Deductions. Be sure to keep records of your deductions as a reminder when you file your taxes in 2014.

Learn more about these rules in Publication 529, Miscellaneous Deductions. The booklet is available on IRS.gov or by calling 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).

Additional IRS Resources

Publication 529, Miscellaneous Deductions
Tax Topic 508 – Miscellaneous Expenses
Schedule A, Itemized Deductions
IRS YouTube Videos:

Standard Versus Itemized Deductions – English | Spanish | ASL
Record Keeping – English | Spanish | ASL
IRS Podcasts:

Standard Versus Itemized Deductions – English | Spanish